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Jefferson Lab Practice and Review -- Science Education at Jefferson Lab

Earth Science 42100G

Assessment: SOL test

This class is a laboratory science class. It is primarily a study of the earth’s composition, structure, processes, and history, its atmosphere, fresh water, and oceans, and its environment in space. The class teaches historical contributions to the development of scientific thought about earth and space.
 
Honors Earth Science 42100H

Assessment: SOL test

The study of Earth Science focuses on the interactions of Earth systems with resulting changes on crustal materials, landforms, rock structures, air, water, and life itself. The study of the earth is extended into the cosmos through an investigative exploration of the universe. Disciplines that will be studied are geology, astronomy, meteorology, and oceanography. Higher levels of thinking and reasoning are taught, including analysis and synthesis. Time will be allocated forindependent research. This class receives honors weighted credit.

Earth Science II: Environmental Systems 42200G
OR
Biology II: Environmental Systems 43400G

Prerequisites: Earth Science or Biology

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the cause-effect relationships existing among/betweenorganisms and their environment. Emphasis is placed on mankind’s impact on the environment and its ecosystems, and on future environmental and ecological needs. Students study a variety of environmental and ecological topics comprising environmental systems, including: global warming; the ozone layer; water pollution; alternative energy sources; interrelationships among resources and an environmental system; biodiversity; biotic and abiotic factors in habitats; ecosystems and biomes; sources and flow of energy through an environmental system; relationships between carrying capacity and changes in populations and ecosystems. Lab work, the use of multimedia and computer simulations, and laboratory and field investigations are important components of this course.

Note: A student may receive credit for Environmental Systems only once regardless of whether it was taken under Course Code 4220 (Earth Science II) or 4340 (Biology II).
 
Oceanography 42500G

Prerequisite: Earth Science

Assessment: Students who have not received a verified credit in Earth Science may be required to takethe SOL test in Earth Science.

This laboratory science is a study of the physical, chemical, geological, and biological aspects of the oceans. Topics include life in oceans, waves, tides and currents, chemistry of seawater, and weather and climate. Students will investigate issues of local, regional, national, and global concern, and will explore possible solutions. Career opportunities in oceanography will be studied.
 
Biology I 43100G

Prerequisite: None

Assessment: SOL test

This is a laboratory science class. It is designed to provide a detailed understanding of living systems and to emphasizealternative scientific explanations related to controlled experiments, analysis and communication of information, and use of scientific literature.

Biology I explores the history of biological thought and the evidence that supports it. It provides the foundation for investigating biochemical life processes, cellular organization, mechanisms of inheritance, dynamic relationships among organisms, and change in organisms. The importance of scientific research that validates or challenges ideas is emphasized.
 
Honors Biology I 43100H

Prerequisite: None

Assessment: SOL test

This laboratory course of general biology is designed to give students an understanding of plant and animal morphology and physiology, as well as nature study, civic biology (ecology), health education, and basic principles of biology. Students are required to read selected articles from an approved list.

Experiments are performed, and students build equipment from raw materials to test scientific principles. Higher levels of thinking and reasoning are taught that include analysis and synthesis. Time will be allocated for independent research. This class receives honors weighted credit.
 
AP Biology 43701A
AP Biology 43702A

Prerequisite: Honors Biology I and Honors Chemistry

Recommendation: Honors Anatomy and Physiology

Assessment: In order to receive weighted credit, students are required to take the AP exam.

This yearlong, two-unit class prepares students for the AP examination in biology. The objectives of this course are defined by the College Board Advanced Placement Program. It is intended for students who have the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills to critically evaluate biological issues. Topics covered include molecules and cells, heredity and evolution, and organisms and populations. These classes receive advanced placement weighted credit.
 
Honors Anatomy and Physiology 43300H

Prerequisite: Biology I or Honors Biology I

Recommended: Chemistry

The purpose of this course is to enable students to effectively link structures of the human body with their functions. Focuses of this class will include anatomical terminology, maintenance of homeostasis, and detailed analysis of the following organ systems: Integumentary, Skeletal, Muscular, Nervous, Cardiovascular, Respiratory, Digestive, Urinary, and Reproductive.

Students will research and discuss abnormalities that occur during development, throughout life, and changes specifically associated with cancers and genetic disorders. This class receives honors weighted credit.
 
Chemistry 44100G

Prerequisite: Biology I or Honors Biology I, Algebra II or Honors Algebra II

Assessment: SOL test

This is a laboratory science class. It is designed to provide a detailed understanding of the interaction of matter and energy investigated through the use of laboratory techniques, manipulation of chemical quantities, and placement of elements, atomic structure, and problem-solving applications. Scientific methodology is used for experimental and analytical investigations. Concepts are illustrated with practical applications.
 
Honors Chemistry 44100H

Prerequisite: Biology I or Honors Biology I; Algebra II or Honors Algebra II

Assessment: SOL tests

This program is designed for students who wish to acquire a strong foundation in chemistry and are interested in taking higher-level high school science courses. Quantitative aspects of chemistry are stressed, and there is heavy emphasis on problem-solving. Honors Chemistry includes an in-depth study of quantitative relationships of energy and matter, molecular structure, kinetic theory, thermodynamics, solution chemistry, and organic chemistry are included in this course. Development of students’ analytical abilities is emphasized through both laboratory experience and discussions in the classroom.

This class receives honors weighted credit.

AP Chemistry 44701A
AP Chemistry 44702A

Prerequisite: Chemistry or Honors Chemistry and Algebra II or Honors Algebra II

Assessment: To receive weighted credit, students are required to take the AP exam.

Recommended Co-requisites: Physics, Advanced Mathematics

This yearlong, two-unit course is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory general chemistry course. It isdesigned to enable students to attain a depth of understanding of the fundamentals of chemistry and a reasonable competence in dealing with chemical problems. Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to comprehend the development of principles and concepts, to demonstrate application of principles, to relate fact to theory and properties to structure, and to understand systematic nomenclature. The course will emphasize experimental procedures, observations of chemical substances and reactions, recording of data, and calculation and interpretation of results based on quantitative data. The course follows an outline proposed by the College Board Advanced Placement Program.

The advanced work in chemistry should not displace any other part of the student’s science curriculum. It is highly desirable that a student has a course in secondary school physics and a four-year college preparatory program in mathematics.